How to Conduct Critical Conversations:: The PCA PREDICT™ Model: Part 2

Share on linkedin
Share on twitter
Share on email
Share on facebook

Predict

In the first article of this three-part series, we discussed how challenging and critical conversations can have a hugely damaging impact on your future relationships if they go wrong. We then outlined the PCA PREDICT™ model as a structured and systematic framework that allows you to prepare for and then successfully conduct such conversations. The first article in the series can be viewed at this link: THE PCA PREDICT™ MODEL: PART 1

In this article, the second of the series, we’ll provide a headline summary explanation of each of the seven stages of the PCA PREDICT™ model. We’ll be discussing nuance and variation within the model in the third and final article of this series. Finally, we’ll follow up this series with some short but more in-depth blogs about each individual stage of the model.

PCA Predict ModelP is for Plan:

Intuitively, we all think we realise that this is often the stage we need to work on the most. Despite this, it’s often the stage that escapes us completely. For this reason, in our blog about Planning, we’ll give you firstly a specific set of questions to answer and secondly focused content for you to prepare, before you enter into any critical conversation.

R is for Rehearse:

This stage may be something that you don’t usually feel is important. However, just as you would hope that a sportsperson or musician would practise before any big performance, it’s vital that you find a way of integrating the rehearsal stage into your pre conversation process. We’ll give you some areas to focus on for this stage of the model, so that it feels more achievable in practice.

E is for Engage:

The first few moments of the conversation could have a definitive impact on what follows. Accordingly, in the Engage blog, we’ll suggest a few key skills that you need to employ fully and ‘switch on’ right from the outset.

D is for Deliver:

Of course, we all think we know what the message is that we’re intending to convey. However, more often than not, this doesn’t quite translate into practice the way we had hoped it would. In the Deliver blog, we’ll give you some clear tools to make sure that the message you intend to deliver is the message that is received.

I is for Investigate:

Questioning and data collection is absolutely vital if we’re going to reach a win:win, mutually beneficial conclusion. However, this is not something that we intuitively do when faced with challenging people or difficult situations. At this stage, we focus on how to make sure you’re both asking the right questions and listening in the right way.

C is for Collaborate:

Ideally, you’re going to find that win:win outcome and get crucial buy-in from the other person, which will help to establish a long-term, mutually profitable relationship with them. However, when you’re looking to achieve all of this, there’s only so far that hitting them with a big stick, or dangling an equally large carrot, can go. In the Collaborate blog, we’ll show you why and how collaboration is your best friend when it comes to critical conversations.

T is for Translate:

There’s no point in carrying out stages 1-6 to perfection, if you then fail to translate any of it into future action. At the final stage of the process, we’ll give you some clear tools that will enable you to turn all of your good work into some tangible results.

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing to browse on this website, you accept the use of cookies.