How to Conduct Critical Conversations:: The PCA PREDICT™ Model: Part 3

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Predict

The first article in our three-part series discussed how challenging and critical conversations can be enormously damaging to your future relationships if they go wrong. We also introduced our PREDICT™ model as a structured and systematic framework that will enable you to prepare for and then successfully conduct such conversations. The first article in the series can be viewed at this link THE PCA PREDICT™ MODEL: PART 1

In the second article of the series, we summarised and discussed the importance of each of the seven stages of the PCA PREDICT™ model. The second article can be viewed at this link THE PCA PREDICT™ MODEL: PART 2

In this, the third and final article of the series, we’ll be discussing nuance and variation within the PCA PREDICT™ model. We’ll also be following up this series with some blogs that will more fully explore each individual stage of the model.

PCA Predict ModelWithin the PCA PREDICT™ model, we appreciate that there will be nuance and variation, depending on the context you’re applying it to. So it’s important that we reflect this nuance and variation within it, given that a model is only as good as its ability to be applied in practice. In this respect, you’ll notice that there are a couple of extra dimensions that we’ve added.

Firstly, there is a dotted line between Rehearse and Engage. This reflects the fact that often, in reality, these types of challenging and critical conversation may not be something you anticipate or activate. For example, it may be that somebody else starts such a conversation with you, often unannounced, and you’re now having to be immediately reactive. In this case, the process will start below the line, and the very first thing you’ll be able to do is Engage.

Secondly, there are rotation arrows between Deliver and Investigate. These are indicative of the fact that different contexts may require you to Investigate before you Deliver, and vice versa. A serious client complaint for example, may need you to ask a plethora of questions to fully understand their position, before you’re in any position to launch into your message delivery.

And lastly, it’s important to recognise that different applications will require a greater or lesser emphasis on any of these seven stages. At PCA Law, we use this model to help clients navigate through any number of conversation-based challenges. And when we do, we’re clear that their focus will be defined by the demands of the particular context and audience that they’re dealing with.

So, now that you have a top-line understanding of what the PCA PREDICT™ model looks like, please keep an eye out for our future blogs on each of its individual stages. These will help build your confidence to start using this model, in order to transform the way that you conduct all definitive and essential day-to-day conversations.

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